Center for Cell Circuitry Seminar
Thursday, April 28, 2022

Karlene A. Cimprich, PhD

Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology
Stanford University School of Medicine

Our genomes are constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous sources of DNA damage, and a growing body of evidence implicates R-loops as an important endogenous source of genomic instability.

R-loops are three-stranded nucleic acid structures consisting of an RNA-DNA hybrid and displaced single-stranded DNA. They are thought to form during transcription when the nascent RNA transcript hybridizes with the DNA template, and various physiological processes are regulated by these structures on chromatin. However, unscheduled or increased levels of R-loops, which can arise when factors that normally regulate their formation are perturbed, can cause the accumulation of DNA damage.

In this talk, Cimprich will summarize their recent work in this area, focusing on the processes driving R-loop-induced DNA damage and genome instability, and new methods to detect and analyze these events.

Details

Date
April 28, 2022
Time
12:00-1:00pm PDT
Location
Online, Genentech Hall 106, Byers Auditorium
Contact(s)






The Center for Cell Circuitry Seminar connects investigators across disciplines to develop single-cell tools to map how cellular components connect into circuits. The center aims to develop new single-cell approaches that overcome limitations inherent in traditional techniques that analyze bulk populations of cells, thereby obscuring individual cell behavior.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

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We want to effect positive change through our events and activities by providing a platform for discussions on important topics related to increasing diversity and inclusiveness in the sciences.