Gladstone-UCSF Institute of Genomic Immunology Seminar
Tuesday, May 17, 2022

Aaron Streets, PhD

Assistant Professor
UC Berkeley

Aaron Streets, PhD, is an assistant professor in bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley, and a Chan Zuckerberg Biohub investigator. He received his PhD in applied physics at Stanford University with Stephen Quake before postdoctoral work at Peking University as a Whitaker International Postdoctoral Fellow and a Ford Postdoctoral Fellow.

The Streets Lab is interested in applying lessons from mathematics, physics, and engineering to invent tools that help to dissect and quantify complex biological systems. Their goal is to uncover laws that govern the interactions of molecules inside the cell and the interactions between cells in a tissue or organism, by making precision measurements on single cells. In pursuit of this goal, they exploit three core technologies: microfluidics, microscopy, and genomics.

Join in person in the Mahley Auditorium at Gladstone or on Zoom!

Details

Date
May 17, 2022
Time
10:00-11:00am PDT
Location
Online, Mahley Auditorium
Contact(s)





The Gladstone-UCSF Institute of Genomic Immunology Seminar Series showcases speakers at the intersection of genomic technology and immunology research with an aim to engineer the human immune system for therapeutic benefit. Speakers span technology development, synthetic biology, bioengineering, and the development and clinical application of immunotherapy. These talks are open to the Gladstone and UCSF communities.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

At Gladstone, we are committed to providing events and professional development activities that resonate with our community’s diverse members. Our goal is to develop creative programming that encompasses a wide variety of ideas and perspectives to inspire, educate, and engage with everyone within our walls.

We want to effect positive change through our events and activities by providing a platform for discussions on important topics related to increasing diversity and inclusiveness in the sciences.