Shomyseh Sanjabi, PhD
Assistant Investigator, Gladstone Institute for Virology and Immunology

Other Professional Titles

Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, San Francisco
Investigator

Phone

(415) 734-4814

Fax

(415) 355-0855

Assistant

Veronica Fonseca
(415) 734-4809

Research Interests

Dr. Sanjabi’s lab studies how innate and adaptive immunity is elicited against pathogens that enter the body via mucosal surfaces. Although mucosal surfaces are a common portal of pathogen entry, we know very little about the host pathogen interactions that result in protective immunity when pathogens enter the body through the genital tract. A better understanding of how robust immunological memory, rather than immune pathology, is initiated and maintained in the genital tract will pave the way for developing vaccines and therapeutics against sexually transmitted pathogens, such as HIV and Zika virus.

Accomplishments

Among her numerous awards, Dr. Sanjabi has received the Sydney C. Rittenberg Potential for Outstanding Research Career Award, the Dorothy Radcliffe Lee Fellowship, the Warsaw Fellowship, a Certificate of Distinction in Teaching
 Award, the Cancer Research Institute Postdoctoral Fellowship. As a junior faculty, in recognition of her innovative approaches to important biomedical problems, she has received the Hellman Family Early Career Faculty Award, the Creative and Novel Ideas in HIV Research Award, and the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award.

Training

Dr. Sanjabi earned a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and molecular genetics from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). For her PhD, she trained with Dr. Stephen Smale at UCLA in microbiology, immunology, and molecular genetics. She then completed a postdoctoral training in immunobiology at Yale University with Dr. Richard Flavell.

Why Gladstone

I was attracted to the possibility of being able to utilize my immunological knowledge to contribute to advancing the research in HIV field, where innovative new ideas are desperately needed to develop a successful vaccine. In addition, the caliber of my colleagues both at Gladstone and UCSF fulfilled my desire to surround myself with the very best in the field.