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Recent Advances

November 28, 2010

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—Scientists at the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease (GIND) in San Francisco have discovered a new strategy to prevent memory deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

October 13, 2010

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—Alzheimer's disease is an extremely complicated disease. Several proteins seem to be involved in its cause and progression.

September 23, 2010

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—Scientists at the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease (GIND) have uncovered new approaches to reduce toxic proteins in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. The results might lead to new treatments for these diseases.

September 9, 2010

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—Amyloid beta (Αβ) proteins, widely thought to cause Alzheimer's disease, block the transport of vital cargoes inside brain cells.

July 21, 2010

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—The Gladstone Institutes and the international pharmaceutical company H. Lundbeck A/S have announced a collaborative research agreement to study and identify therapeutic candidates for neurological diseases.

July 7, 2010

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—Scientists at the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease (GIND) and Stanford University have shown how key circuits in the brain control movement.

December 3, 2009

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—Stimulating the growth of new neurons to replace those lost in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an intriguing therapeutic possibility. But will the factors that cause AD allow the new neurons to thrive and function normally?

March 4, 2009

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—The J. David Gladstone Institutes announced that it has received a major grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation in Los Angeles to establish the Keck Program for Striatal Physiology and Pathophysiology, which will study the origins of movement disorders associated with neurological diseases such as Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases.

January 7, 2009

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—Scientists from the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease (GIND), UCSF, and Stanford have discovered that a certain type of collagen, collagen VI, protects brain cells against amyloid-beta (Aβ) proteins, which are widely thought to cause Alzheimer's disease.

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