Center for Cell Circuitry Seminar
Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Julie Overbaugh, PhD

Faculty Member, Human Biology Division, Fred Hutch

Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) is one of HIV research’s greatest successes, achieved thanks to contributions across disciplines. The Nairobi Breastfeeding Clinical Trial was one of the early trials to address risk of MTCT due to breast milk exposure. Julie Overbaugh will use the Nairobi Breastfeeding Clinical Trial and the collaborations that emerged from it to illustrate the potential of interdisciplinary, international collaborations to understand HIV immunity and unique aspects of the infant antibody response to HIV infection.

About the Speaker

Julie Overbaugh studies the factors that influence HIV transmission. She has been involved in decades-long research studies in Kenya that focus on HIV transmission, from mother to infant and in sex workers. In the 1990s, Overbaugh was part of the team that highlighted the risk of HIV transmission in breast milk, giving HIV-positive mothers important information that could protect their children. Drawing on samples collected during this groundbreaking trial, she has also outlined characteristics of a mother’s immune response against HIV that can protect her infant, and charted aspects of the infant immune response that could help improve HIV vaccine design. Overbaugh’s research of sex workers highlighted the role that other infections play in shaping the number of HIV variants that hop from one person to another. Her team also studied how the immune system responds when a person already infected with HIV is infected a second time with a new strain.

The Gladstone Center for Cell Circuitry connects investigators across disciplines to develop single-cell tools to map how cellular components connect into circuits. The center aims to develop new single-cell approaches that overcome limitations inherent in traditional techniques that analyze bulk populations of cells, thereby obscuring individual cell behavior.

Details

Date
February 26, 2020
Time
12:00-1:00pm
Location
Mahley Auditorium

The Center for Cell Circuitry Seminar connects investigators across disciplines to develop single-cell tools to map how cellular components connect into circuits. The center aims to develop new single-cell approaches that overcome limitations inherent in traditional techniques that analyze bulk populations of cells, thereby obscuring individual cell behavior.